KS3 History

Year 7 History

During Year 7 the following topics are covered:

  • Introduction to History
  • Did the historian Marc Morris get it right about the significance of the Norman Conquest?
  • Belief and Religion in the Medieval Period
  • Medieval Power: Who was the best medieval Monarch?
  • Medieval Ordinary Lives: What were medieval peasants’ lives really like?
  • Migration Over Time: A thematic study
  • Introduction into the Early Modern Era

History

Did the historian Marc Morris get it right about the significance of the Norman Conquest?

Students will learn about; the Norman invasion of England, focusing on the question: Does Marc Morris get it right about the significance of the Norman Conquest? It begins with the death of Edward the Confessor in January 1066 without an heir before moving through the events of 1066 including the Battle of Hastings before culminating in examining the significance of the Norman Conquest for England.

Belief and Religion in the Medieval Period

Students will learn about; our first key theme of KS3: Beliefs. Students will look at how we can identify the importance of religion at this time via key topics such as Doom Paintings, pilgrimages and the Crusades. It allows the students to learn the importance of religion at this time, but also analyse the fact that it may not have been central to all lives. Students will develop their use of understanding historical interpretations and arguing how far they agree with these.

Medieval Power: Who was the best medieval Monarch?

Students will learn about; our second key theme of KS3: Power.  In this unit, students are introduced to the concept of Medieval Power, how well it is exercised and historical concepts such as change and continuity and cause and consequence. The unit also has a heavy focus on historical interpretations and allows students to understand how interpretations are constructed and indeed invites students to challenge established historians’ claims.

Medieval Power: Who was the best medieval Monarch?

Students will learn about; our second key theme of KS3: Power.  In this unit, students are introduced to the concept of Medieval Power, how well it is exercised and historical concepts such as change and continuity and cause and consequence. The unit also has a heavy focus on historical interpretations and allows students to understand how interpretations are constructed and indeed invites students to challenge established historians’ claims.

Medieval Ordinary Lives: What were medieval peasants’ lives really like?

Students will learn about; our third key theme of KS3: Ordinary Lives. There is a combination of overview and depth learning that helps pupils to understand where each lesson fits into the big picture of the curriculum.  This unit tells the chronological story of the lives of ordinary people in the Medieval period.  It begins with an overview of work, leisure and justice for ordinary people and then moves on to two archaeological enquiries as well an in-depth look at the Peasants Revolt.

Migration Over Time: A thematic study

Students will learn about; an overview of migration to Britain over time. Students will look at selected case studies, varying from the Romans, Vikings, Huguenots and Windrush migrants, which allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the experiences and positive impact of migrants to Britain. Through looking at Asian and Windrush migration in the 20th century, students also learn about the reaction to these events at the time, gaining an understanding of racism.

Introduction into the Early Modern Era

Students will gain an introduction to the Early Modern Period in preparation for their units in Year Eight. This is a short unit that introduces the students to key developments and changes within the time period, as well as Henry VIII and key events that occurred during his reign. It continues to allow students to practise their skill in using evidence and how to come to their own judgement of significance.

Year 8 History

During Year 8 the following topics are covered:

  • Belief and Religion in the Early Modern Period
  • Early Modern Power: How did Political Power shift in the Early Modern Period?
  • Early Modern Ordinary Lives: To what extent did ordinary lives get better in the period 1500-1700?
  • Cultural Encounters in the Early Modern Period
  • Industrial Period: Overview and Belief & Religion
  • Industrial Power: Was there a shift in power during the Industrial Period?
  • Industrial Ordinary Lives: Did ordinary lives improve in the Industrial Period?

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Belief and Religion in the Early Modern Period  

As in Year 7, this unit focuses on one of our central themes for KS3 History: Beliefs. It looks at how we can see the changes in belief in this time due to the impact of the Reformation, case studies of individuals and places within England that have been affected by this event, and the overall impact that the Reformation would have had on a larger variety of ordinary people within this Period. These case studies include Martin Luther and his 95 Theses, the execution of Richard Whiting and the vandalisation of St. Winifred’s Church.

Early Modern Power: How did Political Power shift in the Early Modern Period?

This unit takes students through our second key theme - Power - within the Early Modern Period. This unit focuses predominantly on the 17th and 18th centuries by looking at both the causation and significance of the English Civil War.  Students then use their understanding of this event to look into the life of Oliver Cromwell and different interpretations of him. Finally, students deliberate the extent of change within the monarchy in the 18th century, as well arguing the believed opinion that change was unlikely in 18th century political elections.

Early Modern Ordinary Lives: To what extent did ordinary lives get better in the period 1500-1700?

This unit takes students through our third key theme - Ordinary Lives - within the Early Modern Period. This unit allows students to look more in depth at how key changes within the Early Modern Period, such as changes to the economy and the belief in witchcraft, affected ordinary lives. Students use a variety of sources to develop an understanding of key aspects of everyday life, Elizabethan poverty and England’s economy in the 16th and 17th centuries, before analysing case studies in witchcraft in both England and Scotland.

Cultural Encounters in the Early Modern Period

This is our final unit on the Early Modern Period within Year 8. It allows students to learn more about England’s encounters and interactions with cultures outside of the country and discuss significance. Students look at the increase of privateering during this time and key causes, before then looking at Walter Raleigh and deciding his significance. Students them develop their skills in interpretations when looking at the Plymouth Colony of 1820, the vandalism of ‘‘Conquistador’ Hernàn Cortés’ memorial and the legacy of the Spanish Empire.

Industrial Period: Overview and Belief & Religion

Firstly, this unit works as an introduction for the students to the Industrial Period, highlighting key changes and developments. It then takes students through our first key theme - Beliefs - within the Industrial Period. Students begin this unit by looking at key changes within the Industrial Period, before analysing the representation of this period in the 2012 Olympics Ceremony. Students then take a closer look at belief and religion during this time, analysing whether the 19th century was truly Christianity’s period of ‘great success’ and the impact of the Enlightenment  and Darwinism on peoples’ beliefs.

Industrial Power: Was there a shift in power during the Industrial Period?

This unit takes students through our second key theme - Power - within the Industrial Period. This unit takes students through pivotal examples of political shifts and riots that took place in this period. Students will start with an overview of political change in this time, determining its key causes. Then students analyse the Peterloo Massacre and historical interpretations of the event. Students then move onto the Swing Riots and analyse key causes of the riots by looking at a case study of two people involved. Students finish the unit looking at the development of feminism and promoting women's rights in this period by discussing two key individuals of the time.

Industrial Ordinary Lives: Did ordinary lives improve in the Industrial Period?

This unit takes students through our third key theme - Ordinary Lives - within the Industrial Period. Students will end Year 8 in a similar way they did in Year 7, understanding how key events and changes within the time period affected everyday life. Students will study the Industrial Revolution and its growth of factories and child labour; looking at how workers were affected by these changes and interpretations of how this time in history should be judged. Students will also look at the lives of women in Victorian England and the interpretations of what made an ‘ideal’ 19th century woman. Finally, students look at Richard Arkwright, an individual from the Period, and decide his significance based on his involvement within Industrial factories.

Year 9 History

During Year 9 the following topics are covered:

  • Empire
  • Why did war break out in 1914?
  • Is it time to pull down Douglas Haig’s statue?
  • The Treaty of Versailles and Hitler
  • How could the Holocaust have happened?
  • What were the origins of the Cold war?

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Empire

Students will learn about; the growth of the British Empire and interactions between the British with Africa, China and India. Students will study the Kingdom of Benin and analyse the reasons for their participation in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and then look into slave narratives; determining their typicality compared to other sources. They will also look into the Benin Bronzes as well as the Benin Massacre. Students will then develop their use of interpretations when looking at the relationships with China and India at this time.

Why did war break out in 1914?

Students will learn about; the long term causes of WW1, the hopes and fears of different countries and how these helped lead to war, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and how this triggered lead to the outbreak of war and finally who was to blame for WW1.

Is it time to pull down Douglas Haig’s statue?

Students will learn about; Why Ernest Coleman went to fight in 1914, WW1 recruitment, life in the trenches, the Battle of the Somme, Douglas Haig on trial and the significance of WW1.

The Treaty of Versailles and Hitler 

Students will learn about; the end of WW1 and the Treaty that Germany agreed to at the end of the war, the German reaction to this treaty, Adolf Hitler’s early life and how Hitler established a dictatorship in Germany. Students will conclude this unit with information on WW2 that works as a platform for their unit on the Cold War.

How could the Holocaust have happened?

Students will learn about; An overview of Jewish persecution through time, Changes in Nazi policy towards Jews, Life in the Warsaw Ghetto, Who killed Abraham Bauman enquiry and was the Holocaust inevitable

What were the origins of the Cold War?

Students will end Year 9 by learning about the Cold War as a depth study, this is one of the most significant and enduring episodes of the 20th century. The unit focuses on the Cold War’s origins and the change in relationship between America and the USSR from 1945-1956. Students will analyse the change in relationship by looking at the end of WW2, the impact of the atomic bomb and political ideologies.

KS3 Wider Reading

KS3 Wider Reading:

The link below is to suggest some historical fiction for both enjoyment and to widen your knowledge of the topics we cover at KS3. It will also supply evidence for students working towards their History Level 2 badge, whilst at Hyde! Some of these books will be available to students at the school library. 

Wider Reading